Election Party Ideas

Event Themes, Topical Themes

Will it be a long night?  Or over by 7 o’clock?

Join your friends and/or family to watch the inane banter of the commentators, marvel at Antony Green’s latest graphics and statistics, and see each seat claimed or conceded.

You’ll need a space for those who want to watch the television and other spaces for those who want to talk. Open your party to guests at 6pm when the polls close so that the really keen don’t start watching at home and have to drag themselves away.

Food-wise have lots of hot finger food, and stores of non-perishables (packets of chips etc) in case it goes on and on.  Likewise, plenty of non-alcoholic drinks would be advisable in case it is a long night. The last thing you want is someone who has over-indulged see their chosen political party thrashed.  And you just might need to stay awake.  Check that you have lots of tea, coffee, milk…

Election Decorations and Games

Play “Pin the seat on the map” – with your eyes open.  Challenge your guests and see how many of them really know where each seat is.

Balloons – pop the seat.  Begin the night with an inflated balloon for each party (red, blue, green, etc) and pop one as each seat it lost. That means 150 for the main parties and a few for greens and independents.  Pop the balloon of the losing party as a seat is lost.

Vote for the silliest promise, silliest quote and silliest election stunt seen in this election campaign.

Play charades where each player has to impersonate a politician’s memorial moment or irritating mannerisms and everyone has to guess/remember who it is.  Start with easy ones like death stares, hair-flicking, the lizard tongue, “Whyalla wipe-out” karaoke.

Election Costumes

Dress up as one of the contenders – let your guests choose or allocate them characters beforehand if you don’t want to have multiple Nicks, Jacquis and Paulines.  On the other hand you could choose one particular pollie and have them in all their variations.

The Big Question – Should you discuss politics?

Conventional wisdom has it that you shouldn’t.  But maybe you should.  Maybe you will find that more people agree with you than you thought and maybe you will get a better understanding of those who don’t agree with you. Perhaps if more people talked about politics sensibly with their friends on a regular basis, we wouldn’t have had to endure a political landscape dominated by catchphrases, shock-jocks and internet trolls.